Kruve for Espresso, an Experiment – Part 1

Since I received my Kruve, I never gotten the chance to test it with Espresso so last week I decided to give it a shot and see what I can do with it. I started by using the 300 and 600 micron sieves and 34.5gm of coffee from the Super Jolly, which is almost two times my usual dose of 17.5gm.

After I shook the Kruve for a minute or so the yield in the middle tray was almost 21.5gm so I lost 13gm between the boulders and fines.

I chose to only use my usual dose of 17.5gm and the results were underwhelming. The shot was too fast and somehow way too bitter. The bitterness can be caused by the coffee lacking the boulders and fines but the water temperature could have been higher than usual as well.

This week, I decided to try the experiment again but this time move the adjustment collar/ring on the Super Jolly couple of notches finer. By doing so, I was hoping to create a finer grind to slow the flow while keeping the dose the same at 17.5gm give or take 0.1 or 0.2gm.

I started with the same amount of coffee I started with last week, which is 34.5gm (remember that the grind is finer here)

After shaking the Kruve for a minute or so, the result was 24.1gm, so I lost a little more than 10gm, which is better than last week when I lost 13gm. This can be attributed to the grinder being more consistent as the grind gets finer or maybe I shook the Kruve harder last week compared to this week.

To stay consistent, I kept the dose to my usual, which is 17.5gm and pulled a shot. The shot was on the slow side but the taste was much more balanced. Still, bitterness was a little higher than I’d prefer but there was absolutely no sourness whatsoever. Personally, I’m not a big fan of sourness in coffee, or anywhere really so this shot was a really good one to my taste.

Next week, I will go only one notch finer instead of 2 notches like I did today and do the same test again and see how the shot will taste. Stay tuned!

The Effects of Different Tamper Bases on Extraction

For this week, I decided to take advantage of the fact that The Force Tamper, which I have reviewed and blogged about before, have been sent to me with multiple bases and make a video to compare the effects the shape of a tamper base plays in the extraction of an espresso shot. What I’m after is to find out if there is a basis to claims that some bases perform better than others taste and looks wise. I chose the following bases for the test as they are more commonly used/known:

  1. Curve
  2. C-Flat
  3. Ripple
  4. Flat

For this test, the following variables are constant:

  • Temperature is maintained at around 200F by doing a 5 to 6 seconds cooling flush
  • The basket is the same one used across all 4 shots, a VST 20g basket in a bottomless portafilter
  • The input is 17g of coffee and the output is around 32g to 34g of liquid.
  • Distribution evenness was maintained by using the WDT distribution technique (paper clip to distribute/agitate the coffee grounds in the basket) and a Chinese knockoff distribution tool similar to the OCD.

The following are pictures showing the shots 10 seconds from the moment the first drop of liquid appeared from the basket. This will give a basis for comparison that’s pretty consistent.

First shot is using the Curve base:
Curve Base - PictureSecond shot using the C-Flat base:C-Flat - PictureThird shouting the Ripple base:Ripple Base - Picture
Fourth shot using the Flat base:
Flat Base - Picture

Looking at the pictures, I seem to think that the Ripple and Flat bases have performed best. Taste wise, I haven’t noticed any major difference, except that the shot extracted using the Curve base tasted unbalanced and the shot extracted using the Flat base tasted the most balanced. Please note that these tasting notes are based on my palette, others may be able to detect much deeper differences and complicated notes that I may have not tasted. I personally use a flat base as I find it to be the easiest to work with and the most consistent but others have found other base shapes to be best for their coffees, use or machines. You can also watch the video below for the full extractions and feel free to leave me comments with any questions or suggestions you may have.

How Involved Should Your Business Be in Politics?

The short answer? Not at all! Here’s my logic on this. Currently, the nation is extremely divided and what that means is that if you, as a business, take the left’s position on a social or political issue, you risk alienating the right and if you take the right’s position on a social or political issue, you risk alienating the left.

As a business, especially if you have investors, your job is to make money. Sure, it is important for your business to stand up for something and have a social cause(s) attached to it but there are plenty of neutral social issues (instead of political positions) and ways your business can get involved without alienating anyone. Some examples include:

  • Veterans issues
  • Autism
  • Breast and other form of cancers
  • People with disabilities
  • Homeless assistance
  • Obesity and health choices
  • Children education improvement
  • Healthier lunch options for schools
  • Community building and cleaning

These are all issues that the left and right can get behind and won’t risk alienating people on either side. If you, the owner of the business, feel one way or the other on some hot button social or political issues such as immigration or refugees you may want to consider keeping your opinion out of the business. You may use your personal social media accounts or other personal platforms to publish your personal opinions while making sure that your customers understand that those opinions are yours and yours only and do not reflect the views of XYZ Coffee Company.

I understand that if you have a physical location/coffee business it may be tempting to attach your business to the political opinion of your business’s geographical location. An example can be a coffee business located in San Francisco, California, where it is predominantly liberal, taking a liberal position on illegal immigration. The issue with doing this is that you may be limiting your business if you are selling coffee and coffee products online or if you have plans to expand your business beyond your current location. A customer located in a predominantly conservative city/state such as Texas, who loves your freshly roasted coffee, may end up taking their money elsewhere.

The backlash Starbucks received after their decision to hire refugees is a great example as to why businesses shouldn’t dive into politics. This article from Fortune.com talks about the boycott Donald Trump’s supporters have initiated and financial impact on Starbucks as a result.

Staying politically neutral is best for your business.

Coffee & Coffee Gear Misconceptions: 01 – More Money = Better Coffee

I have decided to start a series of articles and videos (on my YouTube channel) to address some of the misconceptions out there related to coffee and coffee gear. These articles and videos are not intended for the professional barista or the advanced home Barista who may have already upgraded their home coffee equipments to a semi-professional or semi-commercial equipments. Instead, the articles and videos are intended to provide basic understanding and things to keep in mind when buying coffee gear or when looking to improve coffee and espresso shots.

The first misconception I’d like to address is that some people believe that spending more money on equipments and upgrading their Coffee gear will automatically result in better coffee (take their coffee game to the next level). The reason I’d like to address this first is because from my experience and from my time roaming and reading the coffee forums, home baristas and especially the new comers to the coffee world, tend to constantly upgrade their equipment in pursuing the God shot or the best coffee possible. This pursuit is problematic for many reasons and can be a money pit for home baristas for the following reason: the law of diminishing returns. 

You see, the law of diminishing returns, which refers to a point at which the level of profits/returns or benefits gained is less than the amount of money or energy invested, applies here. To illustrate this point I will be focusing on coffee grinders as an example, as it is one of the most discussed and upgraded piece of coffee equipment. I will also be making a set of assumptions in regards to each of the grinders’ performances as it relates to taste, based on online user feedback and coffee forums discussions. To start, I have chosen the following grinders and rounded up their prices (for ease of calculations).

  • Hario Manual coffee grinder (Hario Ceramic) = $50
  • Breville Smart Grinder Pro = $200 (4X the price of the Hario Ceramic)
  • Baratza Sette 270 = $400 (2X the price of the Smart Grinder Pro)
  • Mazzer Super Jolly Electronic Doserless = $1200 (3X the price of the Sette)
Grinder Price Utility/Benefits (scale of 1 to 100)
Hario Ceramic $50.00 5
Breville Smart Grinder Pro $200.00 25
Baratza Sette 270 $400.00 75
Mazzer Super Jolly Electronic $1,200.00 80

Looking at the table, you can visualize the point of diminishing returns in this case, which is going from the Baratza Sette to the Super Jolly. In this move, you would be spending $800 more just so you can gain 5 additional points or units of benefits! Definitely not a good value. On the other hand, the best move value wise seems to be going from the Hario Ceramic manual grinder to the Breville Smart Grinder pro as an additional $150 multiplied your points or units of benefits by 5 times!
Please keep in mind that the table above does not take into consideration things like durability, looks & design preference by the user, etc. This table is to simply illustrate the point that spending more money may lead to a better coffee but only up to a certain point, after which any incremental increase in coffee quality will require a disproportionate (much higher) dollar investment.